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SBL Style Guide

Examples

The citations below are examples of the most common types of resources used. SBLHS has many other examples for more complex and specialized resources. You can find all the example citations on pages 84-108 of the handbook. 

On another note, SBL prefers that the print edition is cited only because pagination and stable links to electronic versions are not as fixed as a print edition. That said, a PDF ebook that is identical to the print edition can and should be cited as if it were the print copy.

Books

§6.2.1 and §6.2.6 (page 84): A Book by a Single Author/Editor

First footnote:

8. Matthew Levering, Jesus and the Demise of Death: Resurrection, Afterlife, and the Fate of the Christian (Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2012), 106.

 

8. Gabriel N. E. Fluhrer, ed., Atonement (Philipsburg, NJ: P&R, 2010), 20.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Levering, Jesus, 195.

 

13. Fluhrer, Atonement, 22.


Bibliography:

Levering, Matthew. Jesus and the Demise of Death: Resurrection, Afterlife, and the Fate of the Christian. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2012.

 

Fluhrer, Gabriel N. E., ed. Atonement. Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R, 2010.

 

§6.2.2 and §6.2.7 (page 84 and 85): A Book by Two or Three Authors/Editors

First footnote:

8. David Rhoads, Joanna Dewey and Donald Michie, Mark as Story: an Introduction to the Narrative of a Gospel, 3rd ed. (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2012), 78.

 

8. Kelly R. Iverson and Christopher W. Skinner, eds., Mark as Story: Retrospect and Prospect (Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2011), 12.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Rhoads, Dewey and Michie, Mark as Story, 82.

 

13. Iverson and Skinner, 14.


Bibliography:

Rhoads, David, Joanna Dewey and Donald Michie. Mark as Story: an Introduction to the Narrative of a Gospel. 3rd ed. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2012.

 

Iverson, Kelly R., and Christopher W. Skinner, eds. Mark as Story: Retrospect and Prospect. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2011.

 

§6.2.3 and §6.2.8 (page 84 and 86): A Book by Four or More Authors/Editors

First footnote:

8. Michael F. Bird et al, How God became Jesus: The Real Origins of Belief in Jesus' Divine Nature--A Response to Bart Ehrman (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2014), 28.

 

8. Raymond E. Brown et al., eds., Mary in the New Testament: A Collaborative Assessment by Protestant and Roman Catholic Scholars (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1978), 12.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Bird et al., How God became Jesus, 23.

 

13. Brown et al., Mary, 16.


Bibliography:

Bird, Michael F., Craig A. Evans, Simon J. Gathercole, Charles E. Hill, and Chris Tilling. How God became Jesus: The Real Origins of Belief in Jesus' Divine Nature--A Response to Bart Ehrman. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2014.

 

Brown, Raymond E., Karl P. Donfried, Joseph A. Fitzmyer, and John Reumann, eds. Mary in the New Testament: A Collaborative Assessment by Protestant and Roman Catholic Scholars. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1978.

 

Translations and Series

§6.2.4 (page 85): A Translated Volume

First footnote:

8. Albert Schweitzer, The Mysticism of Paul the Apostle, trans. William Montgomery (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), 199.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Schweitzer, Mysticism, 105.


Bibliography:

Schweitzer, AlbertThe Mysticism of Paul the Apostle. Translated by William Montgomery. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.

§6.2.24 (page 85): A Work in a Series

Note: If the series has an abbreviation, use it in place of the full series title in both the first footnote and the bibliography. E.g., use WUNT instead of Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament.

First footnote:

8. Brian C. Small, The Characterization of Jesus in the Book of Hebrews, Biblical Interpretation Series 128 (Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2014), 34.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Small, Characterization, 109.


Bibliography:

Small, Brian C. The Characterization of Jesus in the Book of Hebrews. Biblical Interpretation Series 128. Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2014.

Articles and Essays

§6.3.6 (page 94): An Article in an Encyclopedia or Dictionary

Note: If the reference work has an abbreviated form of the title, use it in place of the full title. E.g., use DNTB instead of Dictionary of New Testament Background.

First footnote:

8. A. Trapè, "AUGUSTINE of Hippo," in Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity, ed. Angelo Di Berardino (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2014), 1:293.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Trapè, "AUGUSTINE," 1:296.


Bibliography:

Trapè, A. "AUGUSTINE of Hippo." Pages 292-298 in vol. 1 of Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity. Edited by Angelo Di Berardino. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2014.

§6.3.1 (page 91): A Journal Article

Note: Use the abbreviated form of the journal title both in the footnote and in the bibliography. E.g., use JBL instead of Journal of Biblical Literature.

First footnote:

8. Samuel Sandmel, "Parallelomania," JBL 81 (1962): 5.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Sandmel, "Parallelomania," 10.


Bibliography:

Sandmel, Samuel. "Parallelomania." JBL 8(1962): 1-13.

First footnote:

8. Archie C. C. Lee, "Scriptural Translations and Cross-Textual Hermeneutics," in The Oxford Handbook of Christianity in Asia, ed. Felix Wilfred (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014), 125.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Lee, "Scriptural Translations," 130.


Bibliography:

Lee, Archie C. C. "Scriptural Translations and Cross-Textual Hermeneutics." Pages 121-133 in The Oxford Handbook of Christianity in Asia. Edited by Felix Wilfred. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Biblical Commentaries

§6.4.9 (page 102): Bible Commentaries

Definition: A stand-alone commentary in a titled series; e.g., a commentary in the New International Commentary on the New Testament (NICNT), or in the Word Biblical Commentary (WBC). Series abbreviations can be found here.

First footnote:

8. Douglas J. Moo, The Epistle to the Romans, NICNT (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1996), 106.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Moo, Romans, 110.


Bibliography:

Moo, Douglas J. The Epistle to the Romans. NICNT. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1996.

 

§6.2.23 (page 90): A Chapter within a Titled Volume in a Multivolume Work

Definition: A multivolume commentary set where multiple commentaries with different authors are found within each volume; e.g., The Expositor's Bible Commentary, The New Interpreter's Bible, and The Cornerstone Biblical Commentary.

First footnote:

8. Richard B. Hays, "Galatians," in The New Interpreter's Bible, ed. Leander E. Keck (Nashville: Abingdon, 1994-2004), 11:215.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Hays, "Galatians," 239.


Bibliography:

Hays, Richard B. "Galatians." Pages 181-348 in vol. 11 of The New Interpreter's Bible. Edited by Leander E. Keck. Nashville: Abingdon, 1994-2004.

 

Ebooks

§6.2.25 (page 90): Electronic Book

E-reader formats: A book file formatted for an e-reader or e-reader app such as a Kindle or Nook (usually in Kindle or EPub format). These formats do not have stable pagination. Thus, you should indicate the chapter and section as precisely as possible after stating the format (e.g., ch. 1.3 or ch. 1, "Conclusion").

Note: A PDF ebook that is identical to the print edition can and should be cited as if it were the print copy. In this case, there is no need to indicate the format of the book.

First footnote:

8. Scot A. McKnight, Community Called Atonement (Nashville: Abingdon, 2007), EPUB edition, pt. 3, ch. 13, "The Paschal Homily."


Subsequent footnote:

13. McKnight, Community, pt. 3, ch. 13, "Recapitulation."


Bibliography:

McKnight, Scot A. Community Called Atonement. Nashville: Abingdon, 2007. EPUB edition.

 

§6.2.25 (page 90): Electronic Book

Website formats: A book hosted on a website where the book is displayed like a normal webpage or series of webpages. Citations of online versions should include a DOI or stable URL. This is especially appropriate for a reference work (i.e., an encyclopedia or dictionary) that has been virtually converted into a website (see the below example).

Note: A PDF ebook that is identical to the print edition can be cited as if it were the physical copy. In this case, there is no need to indicate the format of the book.

First footnote:

8. Moshe J. Bernstein, "Pesher Habakkuk" in Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls, eds. Lawrence H. Schiffman and James C. VanderKam (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000), http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195084504.001.0001/acref-9780195084504-e-390.


Subsequent footnote:

13. Bernstein, "Pesher Habakkuk."


Bibliography:

Bernstein, Moshe J. "Pesher Habakkuk." In Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Edited by Lawrence H. Schiffman and James C. VanderKam. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195084504.001.0001/acref-9780195084504-e-390.

 

Webpages and Blog Entries

§6.4.15 (page 104): Websites and Blogs

If citing a website in general, just place the main URL in the footnote (e.g., www.csntm.org). If citing a specific webpage on a website, follow the examples below.

First footnote:

8. "Christology Study Area," monachos.net, http://www.monachos.net/content/patristics/patristicstudies/35-themes/241-christology. 


Subsequent footnote:

13. "Christology Study Area."


Bibliography:

"Christology Study Area.monachos.net. http://www.monachos.net/content/patristics/patristicstudies/35-themes/241-christology.

 

§6.4.15 (page 104): Websites and Blogs

SBLHS does not require blog entries to be listed in the bibliography. However, if the blog entry is a substantial source for the paper, it should be included.

First footnote:

8. Mark Goodacre, "Jesus' Wife Fragment: Another Round-Up," NT Blog, 9 May 2014, http://ntweblog.blogspot.com. 


Subsequent footnote:

13. Goodacre, "Jesus' Wife."


Bibliography:

Goodacre, Mark. "Jesus' Wife Fragment: Another Round-Up." NT Blog. 9 May 2014. http://ntweblog.blogspot.com.